9 thoughts on “ ...Of Dante’s Inferno ”

  1. The Durling-Martinez edition is the one used in my college Dante class. Together with their translation of Purgatorio (their edition of Paradiso apparently still in progress), the two works have great endnotes for every canto of the poem, good appendices and Purgatorio has a series of 'intercantica' notes which refer the reader to all the parallels between the two works, so you don't have to.
  2. Dante, who certainly accepts the common medieval belief in the essential relationship between names and the things (or people) they represent, at times chooses characters for particular locations in the afterlife based at least in part on their names. "Ciacco" may be the first case of this sort in the poem.
  3. On its most personal level, it draws on Dante’s own experience of exile from his native city of Florence. On its most comprehensive level, it may be read as an allegory, taking the form of a journey through hell, purgatory, and paradise.
  4. In Dante's Inferno, Hell is a vast underground region consisting of concentric levels each of which is deeper and worse than the rest. Sinners are assigned to the appropriate level to receive eternal punishments tailor made for the sins that they committed on earth.
  5. Inferno: Canto I Midway upon the journey of our life I found myself within a forest dark, For the straightforward pathway had been lost.
  6. A journey to the depths of despair. Based on the immensely influential classic poem, Dante’s Inferno takes you on an epic quest of vengeance and redemption through the Nine Circles of Hell. You are Dante, a veteran of the Crusades who must chase his beloved Beatrice and try .
  7. Dante's Inferno Summary Inferno is a fourteenth-century epic poem by Dante Alighieri in which the poet and pilgrim Dante embarks on a spiritual journey. At the poem’s beginning, Dante is lost in a.
  8. The Divine Comedy translated by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (e-text courtesy ILT's Digital Dante Project) INFERNO Inferno: Canto I Midway upon the journey of our life I found myself within a forest dark, For the straightforward pathway had been lost. Ah me! how hard a thing it is to say What was this forest savage, rough, and stern, Which in the very thought renews the fear.

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