8 thoughts on “ The Wild Mountain Thyme - Carrantuohill - Between (CD, Album) ”

  1. Listen to music from Wild Mountain Thyme like The Moose Song, There Were Roses & more. Find the latest tracks, albums, and images from Wild Mountain Thyme.
  2. This song is by The Byrds and appears on the album Fifth Dimension () and on the compilation album The Essential Byrds (). This song is a cover of " Wild Mountain Thyme " by Francis McPeake. Wikipedia has an article on.
  3. full condensed blue highlight denotes album pick Filter Discography By Albums All. Year Album Label AllMusic Rating User Ratings ; Of Moose And Men: Orchard Find Wild Mountain Thyme discography, albums and singles on AllMusic. Find Wild Mountain Thyme discography, albums and singles on AllMusic.
  4. Wild Mountain Thyme. likes. Wild Mountain Thyme is a duo that sings folk music from the 60s and 70s the way it was done back then. Beautiful harmonious voices.
  5. "Wild Mountain Thyme" (also known as "Purple Heather" and "Will Ye Go, Lassie, Go") is a folk song written by Francis McPeake, a member of a well known musical family in Belfast, Ireland, and of .
  6. Covers: The Clancy Brothers recorded the song in and Ed Sheeran recorded it in with many other artists in between, including The Mudmen, Judy Collins, Sarah Moore, The Irish Tenors, Phil Coulter, Brogue, The Corries, John McDermott, The Irish Rovers, The Chieftans, The High Kings 🍏 Wild Mountain Thyme from the album The Clancy Brothers Collection
  7. Wild Mountain Thyme. likes · 1 talking about this. Wild Mountain Thyme is a duo that sings folk music from the 60s and 70s the way it was done back then. Beautiful harmonious voices.
  8. "Wild Mountain Thyme" (also known as "Purple Heather" and "Will Ye Go, Lassie, Go?") is an Irish/Scottish folk brunpybettchamufortribsimpwebcstanorex.coinfo lyrics and melody are a variant of the song "The Braes of Balquhither" by Scottish poet Robert Tannahill (–) and Scottish composer Robert Archibald Smith (–), but were adapted by Belfast musician Francis McPeake (–) into "Wild Mountain Thyme" .

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